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How Often Should You Clean Your Bong?

Have you ever asked yourself, “How Often Should You Clean Your Bong out?” When and how you choose to clean your bong all boils down to personal preference. Some smokers are meticulous about the cleanliness of their glassware. Others leave the water sitting in their bong until a swamp monster moves in. There is wide variability between the state of peoples’ houses, their office cubicles, and their bongs.

It doesn’t matter if you are a clean freak or live in a pigsty. Eventually, the state of your bong is going to reach crisis mode. Even the least sensitive of noses will start to detect the stank emanating from your glass piece. How often should you clean your bong? Probably more frequently than you do.

Why Do You Need to Clean Your Bong at All?

Not sure if you’ve noticed, but smoking a bong means putting your mouth directly on the device. The neck and mouthpiece should be kept in a reasonable state of cleanliness, even a quick wipe down should be enough between full bong clean-outs.

Technically speaking, you are also using the water inside the king’s chamber to filter out harmful particulate created by smoking. Clean water will only last so long, dank bong water will cease to be of any use as a smoke filter. You wouldn’t blow bubbles in swamp water, so why would you want to recreate that experience with your bong.

Do yourself and your lungs a favor, clean your bong water at least once a week. More frequently if you are a daily toker. Freshwater not only improves your smoking experience but should help improve the filtration as well.

Did You Consider the Bacteria Living in Your Bong Water?

Standing water naturally starts to form new life. This is especially true with water containing rotting organic material (which is what is percolating through your bong water). Rotting organic particles foster lifeforms, its an evolutionary fact.

In nature, microorganisms in stagnant water develop a fine, slimy film over the surface. Scientists call this layer of thriving bacteria a biofilm. While it is true that medical experts are increasingly finding that bacteria (in certain circumstances) is good for human health, this likely isn’t the case if you smoke it.

If you don’t clean your bong, you smoke through the biofilm and invite these tiny creatures straight into your lungs. It may be even more harmful than smoking moldy weed because at least in that case it goes through an incineration process. Dirty bong water infiltrates straight into your lungs and takes up residence. Who knows what this will do your smokers’ cough?

Can you Get Sick from a Dirty Bong?

If you are sick, you should already be asking yourself, “How often should you clean your bong water.” Why? Because, you most definitely can get sick from dirty, bacteria-filled bong water. Coughing, dizziness, headaches, rashes, and more are all symptoms of a serious infection. Mold sickness is a dangerous risk from dirty bong water.

To reconfirm, there are no known long-term effects of smoking weed. However, there are short-term side effects. Whether you smoke joints, takes hits of bongs, or prefer dabs, smoking anything leads to respiratory issues. Excess phlegm builds up, constant coughing becomes routine, and you’ll notice a reduced overall lung capacity. All common side effects of smoking weed.

The good news is that none of these issues is long lasting. If you stop smoking weed, these symptoms typically disappear relatively quickly. But what about if you smoked dirty bong water? Well, that’s a much different story.

Dirty bong water, as discussed above, harbors a slew of potentially harmful bacteria. Dirty bongs, including the those with a slimy resin build up or dank water, can also grow mold spores, fungi, and more. While weed smoke isn’t going to make you sick, these pathogens may very likely trigger a much more serious illness than a smokers’ cough.

What Are the Signs you Need to Clean Your Bong Water?

Just how often should you clean your bong? Well, there are many telltale signs to look out for that will give you a clear indication it’s about time. When in doubt, just dump it out!

Heavy Resin Build Up

Despite the water bubbling away inside the chamber of your bong, eventually, with enough use, you’ll start to see bits of resin inside. Little (or big) chunks of gross, bacteria-filled tar. If this starts to build up, its high time you need to flush it out. A bottle brush or a salt and alcohol bath – there are many methods to clean it out.

Terrible Smell

Another clear sign that it’s time to seriously clean out your bong, is the smell. There is perhaps nothing worse than the smell of old bong water. Sometimes it can get so bad that you can smell it throughout the entire room. Other times, it’s just a lingering scent as you take a hit. Either way, if you can smell something akin to old roaches, dump that water out!

The smell is a key indication that there are bacteria, molds and other microorganisms taking root in your bong. As mentioned these are likely harmful to the longevity of your lungs.

Dark, Dank, Water

Take a quick peek at your bong water. Does it look like swamp water? Does it have an opaque quality? Maybe it’s gotten a gray or black hue to it now. Perhaps a biofilm has grown, creating a slime down the sides of the chamber. Clearly, it’s time to clean out your bong and save your lungs from inhaling that gunk.

Clogged Downstem or Bowl

Sometimes, even if you’ve changed out the bong water, the bong itself might actually need to a good washing. Glassware, although a relatively sterile material, loves to collect sticky resin. Take a moment to investigate the state of your downstem and bowl. Are you having trouble drawing air (i.e. smoke) through them?

There is a very high chance that you’ll need to dedicate 30 minutes to proper cleaning of these pieces. These pieces take a bit of elbow grease to really work the resin out of, but you’ll thank us once you take that next easy clean pull from your bong.



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